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Fix & Make | Oyster Shucker


I was asked by the creative folk at Hotel Hotel to be a part of their new Fix and Make program.

It’s a year-long program featuring a host of workshops, event and talks by a range of collaborators all looking at how to fix and make things.

Fixing and making? That’s me! I jumped at the chance to run a workshop with them.

Approached to be part of their day-long Oyster Appreciation workshop - I would be teaching participants how to craft their own oyster shucking knife before they headed off to learn how to correctly shuck and prepare oysters.

I teamed up with my partner and sculptor, Dan Lorrimer to present the workshop.

Now I should mention at this point, I don’t really like oysters… I’ve tried them, they are pretty squishy… they tasted ok… but lets just say I wouldn’t be jumping at the chance to order them next time I’m perusing a restaurant menu.

And so, oyster shucking is a whole new skill I know nothing about, but making – I know lots about making!

Cue Moonlight Oysters.

We met with Steve Feletti of Moonlight Oysters. He know ALL things shucking and all things oysters – a wealth of knowledge! He showed us his favourite shucking tools and told us about the array of different oysters and the corresponding shuckers needed to work with them.

Dan and I set about designing a shucker that would not only work, but be able to be made and assembled on site, in the 2 hour workshop time slot. We needed to pre make some of the metal components that would ensure a sound functioning shucker at the end of the workshop, but it meant we had lots of time for participants to custom make their own handles.

Working around the ideas of fixing and making we were keen to use some materials that are easily accessible. We love the idea that if someone made their handle in the workshop, then later down the track it broke or wore in a way that needed replacing, it was easy to do.

We sourced fallen timber from sticks and small branches. We left them as is, peeling bark, knots, forks – the lot.

Participants carved, sanded and worked their handles to fit their hand. They explored the way the handle felt to use, how the hand instinctively wanted to pick up the odd shaped handles. Was there part in the way? Was there a great little feature in the colour hiding under the bark?

Every handle was different and suited just for who it belonged to.

Dan and I worked out a great little system so we could assemble the metal components with the handles right after they had all been finished and waxed. We also had small leather pieces that everyone stitched up into a pouch, keeping their new oyster shucker safe and sound (and the inside of their pockets hole free!).

See more about the Fix and Make program here.

 

Dan and I worked out a great little system so we could assemble the metal components with the handles right after they had all been finished and waxed. We also had small leather pieces that everyone stitched up into a pouch, keeping their new oyster shucker safe and sound (and the inside of their pockets hole free!).

See more about the Fix and Make program here.

 


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